The idea that each country should have one currency is so deeply rooted in people’s minds that the possibility of multiple and concurrent currencies seems unthinkable. Monetary systems contribute to problems of high unemployment and social distress during financial and economic crisis, so reforms to increase the responsiveness and flexibility of the monetary system can be part of the solution.

This book discusses ‘monetary plurality’, which is the circulation of several currencies at the same time and space. It addresses how multiple currency circuits work together and transform socio-economic systems, particularly by supporting economies at the local level of regions and cities. The book shows that monetary plurality has been ubiquitous throughout history and persists at present because the existence of several currency circuits facilitates small-scale production and trade in a way that no single currency can accomplish on its own.

Monetary plurality can improve resilience, access to livelihoods and economic sustainability. At the same time, it introduces new risks in terms of economic governance, so it needs to be properly understood. The book analyses experiences of monetary plurality in Europe, Japan, and North and South America, written by researchers from East and West and from the global North and South. Replete with case studies, this book will prove a valuable addition to any student or practitioner’s bookshelf.

Content:

1. The monetary system as an evolutionary construct – Georgina M. Gómez;
2. Monetary Plurality in Economic Theory – Jérôme Blanc, Ludovic Desmedt, Laurent Le Maux, Jaime Marques-Pereira, Pepita Ould-Ahmed and Bruno Théret;
3. Making sense of the plurality of money: a Polanyian attempt – Jérôme Blanc;
4. How does monetary plurality work at the household level? The division of labour among currencies in Argentina (1998-2005) – Georgina M. Gómez;
5. Monetary federalism as A concept and its Empirical underpinnings in Argentina’s monetary history – Bruno Théret;
6. Famine of Cash: Why Have Local Monies Remained Popular throughout Human History? Akinobu Kuroda;
7. The pervasiveness of monetary plurality in economic crisis and wars – Georgina M. Gómez and Wilko von Prittwitz und Gaffron;
8. Birth, Life and Death of a Provincial Complementary Currency from Tucuman, Argentina (1985 – 2003) – Bruno Théret;
9. Community Currency and Sustainable Development in Hilly and Mountainous Areas: A Case Study of Forest Volunteer Activities in Japan – Yoshihisa Miyazaki and Ken-ichi Kurita;
10. Sustainable Territorial Development and Monetary Subsidiarity – Marie Fare;
11. Relationship between people’s money consciousness and circulation of community currency –  Shigeto Kobayashi, Takashi Hashimoto, Ken-ichi Kurita and Makoto Nishibe;
12. Gaming Simulation using Electronic Community Currencies: Behavioural Analysis of Self-versus-Community Consciousness – Masahiro Mikami and Makoto Nishibe;
13. For the policy maker: when and how is monetary plurality an option – Georgina M. Gómez.

For more information and to order this book directly from the publisher see
https://www.routledge.com/Monetary-Plurality-in-Local-Regional-and-Global-Economies/Gomez/p/book/9781138280281


Jump directly to the following questions covered in this interview:

Q 1 – Where does money come from?
Q 2 – Is money neutral?
Q 3 – Why is money scarce?
Q 4 – Can this monetary system work sustainably?
Q 5 – Does the financial system need growth?
Q 6 – Why are you interested in monetary-systems?
Q 7 – Do we have just one monetary system at the moment? Like a monopoly?
Q 8 – What would you propose regarding the monetary system?
Q 9 – Are there alternatives to the current monetary system?
Q 10 – Why is there this speechlessness about money-topics?
Q 11a – What kind of behaviour does our money-system create between people?
Q 11b – Does the scarcity of money harm only the poor people?
Q 11c – What does money do to people and their relationships?
Q 12 – How did you discover complementary currencies?
Q 13 – Did the knowledge of complementary currencies effect your life?
Q 14 – What do you think your co-author Margrit Kennedy achieved in regard to monetary systems?
Q 15 – Are there changes to this financial system?
Q 16 – What do you think about internet-based currencies like Bitcoin and the new technology Blockchain?
Q 17 – You observed the global financial development for decades. What do you conclude from your experience?
Q 18 – Where do you see practical progress concerning complementary currencies?
Q 19 – What would you propose for countries which are in Euro-crisis like Greece?
Q 20 – If you were in power, what would you do?
Q 21 – What do you think about the Euro?
Q 22 – For which task do we need the Euro?
Q 23 – Could a currency have influence on the question of war or peace?
Q 24 – Are there “currency-wars” or wars because of currencies?
Q 25 – Does the money-system polarize?
Q 26 – Can a national lead-currency deprive other currencies and nations?
Q 27 – What is the motivation for your work?
Q 28 – Do you like to give a message to the next generation?

Jump directly to the following questions covered in this interview:

Q 1 –   How did you start thinking about money?
Q 2 –   Is your work on money-systems related to your personal experiences?
Q 3 –   What did you expect when you started your research and what do you think about your findings today?
Q 4 –   Do you see any positive effect of the financial-crisis of 2008?
Q 5 –   Do you think we will experience more financial crises in the future?
Q 6 –   Where do you see big obstacles for changing the financial system?
Q 7 –   Which practical projects do you consider capable of changing something in our economy?
Q 8 –   How likely is it, trying to make a living with work that you really enjoy?
Q 9 –   What would you tell people who feel helpless and ask, what they can do to make a change?
Q 10 – Does the monetary system hurt people? Do you have personal experience with systemic violence of the financial system?
Q 11 – How is scarcity of money artificially built into our system?
Q 12 – Regarding your children – what do you fear and what do you hope for?

Jump directly to the following questions covered in this interview:

Q 1 –   How did you start thinking about money?
Q 2 –   Is your work on money-systems related to your personal experiences?
Q 3 –   What did you expect when you started your research and what do you think about your findings today?
Q 4 –   Do you see any positive effect of the financial-crisis of 2008?
Q 5 –   Do you think we will experience more financial crises in the future?
Q 6 –   Where do you see big obstacles for changing the financial system?
Q 7 –   Which practical projects do you consider capable of changing something in our economy?
Q 8 –   How likely is it, trying to make a living with work that you really enjoy?
Q 9 –   What would you tell people who feel helpless and ask, what they can do to make a change?
Q 10 – Does the monetary system hurt people? Do you have personal experience with systemic violence of the financial system?
Q 11 – How is scarcity of money artificially built into our system?
Q 12 – Regarding your children – what do you fear and what do you hope for?

Jump directly to the following questions covered in this interview:

Q 1 –   How did you start thinking about money?
Q 2 –   Is your work on money-systems related to your personal experiences?
Q 3 –   What did you expect when you started your research and what do you think about your findings today?
Q 4 –   Do you see any positive effect of the financial-crisis of 2008?
Q 5 –   Do you think we will experience more financial crises in the future?
Q 6 –   Where do you see big obstacles for changing the financial system?
Q 7 –   Which practical projects do you consider capable of changing something in our economy?
Q 8 –   How likely is it, trying to make a living with work that you really enjoy?
Q 9 –   What would you tell people who feel helpless and ask, what they can do to make a change?
Q 10 – Does the monetary system hurt people? Do you have personal experience with systemic violence of the financial system?
Q 11 – How is scarcity of money artificially built into our system?
Q 12 – Regarding your children – what do you fear and what do you hope for?

Jump directly to the following questions covered in this interview:

Q 1 –   How did you start thinking about money?
Q 2 –   Is your work on money-systems related to your personal experiences?
Q 3 –   What did you expect when you started your research and what do you think about your findings today?
Q 4 –   Do you see any positive effect of the financial-crisis of 2008?
Q 5 –   Do you think we will experience more financial crises in the future?
Q 6 –   Where do you see big obstacles for changing the financial system?
Q 7 –   Which practical projects do you consider capable of changing something in our economy?
Q 8 –   How likely is it, trying to make a living with work that you really enjoy?
Q 9 –   What would you tell people who feel helpless and ask, what they can do to make a change?
Q 10 – Does the monetary system hurt people? Do you have personal experience with systemic violence of the financial system?
Q 11 – How is scarcity of money artificially built into our system?
Q 12 – Regarding your children – what do you fear and what do you hope for?

Jump directly to the following questions covered in this interview:

Q 1 –   How did you start thinking about money?
Q 2 –   Is your work on money-systems related to your personal experiences?
Q 3 –   What did you expect when you started your research and what do you think about your findings today?
Q 4 –   Do you see any positive effect of the financial-crisis of 2008?
Q 5 –   Do you think we will experience more financial crises in the future?
Q 6 –   Where do you see big obstacles for changing the financial system?
Q 7 –   Which practical projects do you consider capable of changing something in our economy?
Q 8 –   How likely is it, trying to make a living with work that you really enjoy?
Q 9 –   What would you tell people who feel helpless and ask, what they can do to make a change?
Q 10 – Does the monetary system hurt people? Do you have personal experience with systemic violence of the financial system?
Q 11 – How is scarcity of money artificially built into our system?
Q 12 – Regarding your children – what do you fear and what do you hope for?

Jump directly to the following questions covered in this interview:

Q 1 –   How did you start thinking about money?
Q 2 –   Is your work on money-systems related to your personal experiences?
Q 3 –   What did you expect when you started your research and what do you think about your findings today?
Q 4 –   Do you see any positive effect of the financial-crisis of 2008?
Q 5 –   Do you think we will experience more financial crises in the future?
Q 6 –   Where do you see big obstacles for changing the financial system?
Q 7 –   Which practical projects do you consider capable of changing something in our economy?
Q 8 –   How likely is it, trying to make a living with work that you really enjoy?
Q 9 –   What would you tell people who feel helpless and ask, what they can do to make a change?
Q 10 – Does the monetary system hurt people? Do you have personal experience with systemic violence of the financial system?
Q 11 – How is scarcity of money artificially built into our system?
Q 12 – Regarding your children – what do you fear and what do you hope for?

Jump directly to the following questions covered in this interview:

Q 1 –   How did you start thinking about money?
Q 2 –   Is your work on money-systems related to your personal experiences?
Q 3 –   What did you expect when you started your research and what do you think about your findings today?
Q 4 –   Do you see any positive effect of the financial-crisis of 2008?
Q 5 –   Do you think we will experience more financial crises in the future?
Q 6 –   Where do you see big obstacles for changing the financial system?
Q 7 –   Which practical projects do you consider capable of changing something in our economy?
Q 8 –   How likely is it, trying to make a living with work that you really enjoy?
Q 9 –   What would you tell people who feel helpless and ask, what they can do to make a change?
Q 10 – Does the monetary system hurt people? Do you have personal experience with systemic violence of the financial system?
Q 11 – How is scarcity of money artificially built into our system?
Q 12 – Regarding your children – what do you fear and what do you hope for?

Jump directly to the following questions covered in this interview:

Q 1 –   How did you start thinking about money?
Q 2 –   Is your work on money-systems related to your personal experiences?
Q 3 –   What did you expect when you started your research and what do you think about your findings today?
Q 4 –   Do you see any positive effect of the financial-crisis of 2008?
Q 5 –   Do you think we will experience more financial crises in the future?
Q 6 –   Where do you see big obstacles for changing the financial system?
Q 7 –   Which practical projects do you consider capable of changing something in our economy?
Q 8 –   How likely is it, trying to make a living with work that you really enjoy?
Q 9 –   What would you tell people who feel helpless and ask, what they can do to make a change?
Q 10 – Does the monetary system hurt people? Do you have personal experience with systemic violence of the financial system?
Q 11 – How is scarcity of money artificially built into our system?
Q 12 – Regarding your children – what do you fear and what do you hope for?